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Open Access Highly Accessed Original research article

Mortality rates in Israel from causes amenable to health care, regional and international comparison

Nehama Goldberger* and Ziona Haklai

Author Affiliations

Department of Health Information, Ministry of Health, 4 Shalom Yehuda Street, Jerusalem, 93480, Israel

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Israel Journal of Health Policy Research 2012, 1:41  doi:10.1186/2045-4015-1-41

Published: 25 October 2012

Abstract

Background

Mortality from causes amenable to health care is a valuable indicator of quality of the health care system, which can be used to assess inter-regional differences and trends over time. This study investigates these mortality rates in Israel over time, and compares inter-regional and international rates in recent years.

Results

Age-adjusted amenable mortality rates have been decreasing steadily in Israel, by 31% for males and 28% for females between 1998–2000 and 2007–2009. Amenable mortality was lower in the center of the country than in the Northern, Southern, and Haifa districts. The proportion of mortality from circulatory diseases was highest in the North and Haifa districts and from cancer in the Tel-Aviv and Central districts. A higher proportion of infectious diseases was seen in the Southern district.

In comparison with amenable mortality rates in 20 European countries, Israel ranked 8th lowest for males and 12th lowest for females, in 2008. The rate was lower than in Britain, Ireland, and Portugal; lower than in Germany, Spain, Austria, and Finland for males; and higher than France, Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, and Italy. But Israel ranked higher in the decrease in amenable mortality rates between 2001 and 2007 for females than males in a 19 country comparison. Genitourinary diseases were a larger component in Israel than other countries and circulatory diseases were smaller.

Conclusion

The indicator of amenable mortality shows improvement in health outcomes over the years, but continuing improvement is needed in health care and education, in particular in the periphery of Israel and for females.

Keywords:
Amenable mortality; Regional differences; Causes of death; Periphery; Health services